The BeBop Channel Full Broadcast ONE (MATURE) BeBopTV.com

The BeBop Channel Full Broadcast ONE (MATURE) BeBopTV.com


♪ Avocado is the game ♪ ♪ If you lose, I change your name ♪ ♪ M-I-C-K-E-Y-P-L ♪ – [Postal Worker] Hey,
hey, I got a package for y’all to go inside with. You all working with them inside, right? – Yeah, this our summer job, skin tights. – Where is that mother fucker? His flight came in over an hour ago. – Traffic, La Guardia, what can you say? – Hmm, man, Duke Jordan died. (saxophone music) Man, Sam Brown died too? – Icewater, do you have to
take up the whole front seat? How long are we living
together, five years? Me and Mickey, 25. – Wow. – All that time, I never asked you, what made you pick the sax? – Simple, I was first
in line on music day. You know back in them
days in elementary school, you had to be on time or you’d get stuck
playing with the trombone or the tuba or some shit like
that. Aint that right Mick? – Damn, I can’t believe how many people are
falling off the planet. – At least you all had instruments, not like these kids up around here now. – True that. And Bass never let a day go by without reminding us how lucky we were to have his old broke down
ass as our music teacher. Ain’t that right, Mick? Playing
shit is not without cost. I remember this girl told me she wasn’t gonna be seen talking to me unless I could play better
than Maceo and the J.B.’s. Said she wasn’t gonna be
seen with nobody skating. So you know what I did? I said, you know what I did? – What?
– What, what’d you do? – I said, ♪ Get up, get on up, get up, get on up ♪ (laughing) Oh man, back in them days in DC, there used to be this club called Rands over there near the old bus station. Man, we used to be in there funking it up. We played jazz too but that was that late night shit. – Over 30 musicians died in the last year. Unbelievable. – There he goes. – Man, we oughta jump his ass. Whoop that ass, punk ass mother fucker, punk ass mother fucker. – Look fellas, we need him. We’ve got $500,000. That’s a lot of cash but it’s not gonna get
us where we need to go. – Fuck him. Central bank printing mother fuckers. That 500K might as well be $50. – Oh, I missed you. – I never thought in a million years we’d be graveling to this mother fucker.
– You look like you been putting a little
something something on since I’ve been gone. – Yeah, but that boy can play, Bass. – Man, when we get in there, just let me do the talking. We got to set him up so he’ll go for it. – After three weeks in Europe, I missed this. – Look, mother fuckers so late, I got to wait for alternate
side of the street parking. – I missed you. I feel like you’re always traveling. One minute you’re here and
then you’re gone again. – You wait, alright? ‘Cause you’re just gonna
piss him off anyway. True. What you want me to do? I mean, work in Harlem for $50 a night? See that shit is just plain disrespectful, you know what I’m saying? Plus, we going through the
500,000 Big Daddy just gave us, you know what I mean? – [Male] Did you hear that? – And with these financial terrorists central bank money printing
like Monopoly mother fuckers, shit that valued at 500,000, go poof just like that over night. – So then, maybe we could
start thinking about doing something else, diversify what you do so we don’t run through the money, like teach. – What? No, no, no, no, no see, I play, that’s what I do. (jazz music) – I know that’s what you do but I left what I do for you. – [Voiceover] My family, my friends. I’m stuck here alone waiting
for you all the time. – I don’t want to talk
about this right now. – We’re gonna talk about it now. – Man We get a show. – I did a lot to get you that money, to get us that money. – [Mickey] Uh oh, I knew this was gonna be–
– Wait, wait, wait, shhh. – Let me tell you something, baby. Big Daddy, Mr. Big Daddy, CEO Big Daddy whatever the fuck his
little ass name is, okay, he gave me and the old man
500,000 for our tracks. So if you really think about it, you ain’t really, you know, you ain’t, you ain’t do shit. – Oh really, are you serious? – Damn. – If it hadn’t been for me singing poorly on Mickey’s track, that old man would’ve been better off. He would’ve won and not you. – Whatever. – Alright then, so how ’bout
I give Mr. Big Daddy a call, tell him what you’ve been up to? Breach of contract or a
little tort might just– – As funny as this shit is, she’s about to screw our lottery ticket. – [Chuck] Come on, baby. – [Female] I helped you and got you paid and now I want your help. – I know what you want, I know what this is all about. – All this other bullshit needs to stop. – It’s about that little trip, right? That little trip you wanted to take? – I’m sorry, alright. I mean look, didn’t I get you that job at the Jazz Foundation? – Yeah with those old ass people. – We’ll take it. As soon as I get back from tour, okay? I’m $500,000 richer. Shit, I’ll cancel the shit right now, that’s what you want? – I want a house, I want a ring, I want a wedding. Oh yeah, a big wedding. – [Both] Oh shit! – There goes our money. – Hey man women love shopping. – Just got to figure out a way I can play and not have to do as much travel. I’ll get you your dream and I’ll get mine, we gonna work it out. Damn, Three Stooges, man, Mickey, Manny and where
the hell is Blacky? Man, what the hell y’all doing at my crib? – Just let them in. – Look man, we’re here to propose a truce and run something by you and by the looks of it, it just might be something
you’re interested in. – Man, we’re opening up
a joint on 135th Street, you want in? Hey man, I like gorgeous
women, fine cars, nice threads way too much to risk all these winnings. – Look Chucky, the music is
dying up here north of 125th, Lenox Lounge is closed. – Mark Four, Blue Book, Club
Baron and St. Nick’s Pub, they’re all gone. – But how much are we
talking about, Mickey? – We got the spot on 135th
Street, the old Hudson Club, needs a lot of work but look, why don’t you
stop by once you get settled and we can discuss the numbers then? – Mickey, guys, no hard feelings right? – Alright look fellas, it’s time for y’all to go. Look, I’mma stop through
later, alright, come on, get your Manny Moe ass
out my crib, let’s go. I’ll see y’all. (jazz music) – [Mickey] Back in the
day, I was smooth as silk. Black man, look at me. There wasn’t a club I didn’t play where they didn’t know what time it was. Playing with Art Blakey
and the Jazz Messengers, Sonny Rollins, Jackie McLean, yeah, I’ve come a long way. All the way to– – What’s up boss?
– Hey. – [Mickey] Okay, get back to work. – Yeah, get your asses back to work before I serve my foot up your ass– – Stupid little kid. – You get your stupid ass out of here. – [Mickey] Look what the dog dragged in. Boy, I haven’t seen you in a coon’s age. – My mind is a terrible thing to waste. Hi y’all. I’m Dr. Jeff. Now, you probably know me
as America’s psychologist but I’m also one of
Mickey’s oldest friends and we were running back on 82nd Street on the Upper West Side. I was taking piano lessons from him, we were running around
and smoking a little herb and looking at women’s behinds, you know all the stuff that we shouldn’t be doing, especially as a budding psychologist. But Mickey and I, we had
kind of a falling out and I’m going to be the bigger man and put that behind us by congratulating Mickey on your new spot. – Look like I finally got
across the finish line. Don’t know how much longer
I’mma be on the planet. Did you know that Jackie McLean died and Freddie Hubbard died? – Mickey, are you going
to go down that path, that dark path again? Do you know how much time you’ve wasted? Mickey, I’m here on a
philanthropic mission and as you know, I’m the director of the
Jazz Elders Foundation and we’re doing a fall fundraiser, Mickey. One of my employees
actually pulled my coat and said that you had this spot. So here I is. – Well you know I got you. – Thanks, Mickey. – Just let me know when. – I know, I know, Mickey. – Now did you know that Ben Riley died? – I wish you’d stop looking at
that damn phone all the time. Who else has died? This OCD with the darkness and people dying, it’s gotta stop. You need to come to my office, you know the drill, front and center next week. – I know the deal all too well. Get that smug look off
your face talking about me. Check yourself, make sure you got two. – Yeah, I do and if I wasn’t a respected member of the mental health community, I would tell you to kiss
my brown pimply ass, you mullet mouthed, woody
woodpecker, cock sucking, oldish Gambino, numbing mother fucker. I’ll be there. – Yeah right. (upbeat music) Like I told you, it’s gonna take a lot of work but it’ll be alright. – What the hell is he doing here? You want me to take him? – Marist! – Man, get out of here. It’s gonna take a lot of work? Exactly how does this work? – So here’s what we got, with the house band and all the cats, they’ve agreed to work for $50 a night, staff, minimum plus tips– – Gonna take a minute or two to even think about a liquor license. In the meantime, the lease
is 2,700 bucks a month. – 2,700? Man, I get a nice little
apartment in Manhattan. – $100,000 in the pot, 25% stake
with a three percent option that’s the deal. – Tell you what man, 200,000,
50% stake, three year option. I get a say in whoever’s getting booked up in this joint, man and I headline here from time
to time when I’m in town. Final counter, take that or leave it. – [Mickey] Deal. – [Chuck] We’ve got a deal? – [Mickey] It’s a deal. – And look man, just keep your
eyes off my girl, alright? Keep that little crusty ass
knarly toe out the cradle and one foot in the
grave where it belongs. – Look, I was in Baghdad while you were still in your dad’s bag. – [Chuck] Fellas, we
got a serious problem. First, I see little kids
out there saying it. ♪ M-I-C-K-E-Y-P-L ♪ – [Chuck] Then you got
people from the media saying it.
– Hi, I’m Zaire from WTVG and I’m outside a New Club, Mickey’s Place on 135th Street. – [Chuck] Then I’m looking
at this dumb ass sign. What the hell is this man, Mickey’s Place? – What, they spell it wrong or something? – Funny as fuck, cue ball. – No, he’s just bent out of shape ’cause it doesn’t say Chuck’s Place. – You know what? Why shouldn’t it say Chuck’s Place, man? Shit, I’m the future. – Man listen, you got Mickey here, 50 years of history behind his name. He done played on every continent, all the musicians, one of our Senior Soldiers? What you got? Instapic or Instagram or
whatever the hell that shit is. – What I got is my foot
in your funky ass, Mukaka. – What you call me? – Hold on, hold on. – I’m holding man. Man, hold that noise down back there, man. First of all, man, I own half this shit. You know what? Who the hell are y’all anyway? When y’all ilk took over
man, jazz was on top. Man, Duke Ellington was like a God. Train’s, man, Love
Supreme went platinum man, and Buhaina and Art Blakey, he was like a household name, man. Don’t nobody know shit about jazz now ’cause y’all done fucked this shit up. – The boy does have a point. – So what are we gonna call
it, Chuck and Mickey’s? Bass and Ass. (laughing) – Man, that shit sounds boodie. – Look man, we gonna
settle this thing like men with a wager. – What like you can’t spell
A flat half diminished? – A flat, C flat, E double flat, G flat, don’t try me Bass, I’m serious man. I’mma race you. – What? Like you’re in some high
school, mother fucker, we’re gonna have a race? Since we are so old, Mickey is 74, that wouldn’t be a fair fight. So you race Icewater, 100 yards. – [Chuck] Alright man, you got a deal. – [Mickey] And just one more thing, the loser has to play in the
house band to help cut costs and that’s just between me and you. (jazz music) – [Chuck] Wait a minute, why’d
you agree to this so quick? And what was you saying in his ear man? (jazz music) – [Mickey] As you can see,
Ice is in pretty good shape. He ran the 100. In under 9 seconds. – Man, you lying, man Usain Bolt can’t run
100 in under 9 seconds. (jazz music) 100 meter, 100 yards, damn. (jazz music) – You know Mickey, certainly
you’re a great musician, you’ve played with great musicians but as your therapist I have to tell you, you seem to keep going down this path as to the music dying that there’s been a bad ending to it, that the people that you
worked with are all gone and it makes me really wonder whether at this point, you are experiencing
some sort of a depression because you’re only looking
at the negativity of this instead of what’s really now
coming up through the jazz. And so we’re gonna keep
talking about that. (jazz music) – Playing this shit is not without cost. I remember this girl told me she wasn’t gonna be seen talking to me unless I could play better
than Maceo and the J.B.’s. Said she wasn’t gonna be
seen with nobody skating. So you know what I did? I said, you know what I did? – What?
– What, what’d you do? – I said ♪ Get up, get on up, get up, get on ♪ (jazz music) – I remember dad, you and mom got his car with a hatch back. I said, “I’d be happy
to give you the money “to get a really great car.” And you said, “Well
no, this works for me.” I says, “Why?” “Because it’s the right
height to put the meals in.” Dad, tell me when you first got an inkling about Meals on Wheels. – There was kind of an abandoned house, that’s where we got started
with Meals on Wheels. We kind of filled a need for
people as they got older. – It’s the human interaction that probably fed them
much more than the food. – Oh yeah. When you can see somebody else benefiting by your life in some way, you can’t help but feel
good about it, I think. – Well the reason I’m involved, dad, is because you are and you’re so inspiring, how you’ve impacted people is enormous. – [Female] Drop off a warm meal and get more than you expect. Volunteer at americaletsdolunch dot org. – [Howard And Richard]
America, let’s do lunch. – [Male] Upright Bass, The Musical Life and Legacy of
Jamil Nasser, A Jazz Memoir. (jazz music) – Hey everyone, this is Dr.
Jeff Gardere from Giant Steps and you’re watching the BeBop Channel. – On my way to the river
right now to practice. Got up 20 minutes ago but I’m dead tired as I always am. I got this gig in a couple of days and honestly, I just haven’t
been able to get on the wood. We’ve had so much to do. That’s just the problem. There’s too much to do, you know and not enough time to prepare
for anything, you know, which is partly why for awhile I’ve, I’ve been back and forth about, I don’t know, just
quitting with performing. I mean I’m not gonna quit tap dancing but sometimes I’m wondering
if I need to just retire from maybe the performing
aspects of tap dancing and just teach. Oh look at this. It’s like we live in a project building. Paying all this rent just to walk out the elevator and see salad laying on the floor like we live in some project. Man. I think the thing that’s frustrating about being a tap dancer
in this world today is that it’s this feeling
that I’m by myself, like I’m alone, like I’m the only one who is trying to groom myself as a dancer, get this work and have raised four kids and be happily married. It’s hard. Feel a little stale this morning but here’s what I got to say. (tapping) Time to wake up guys. Azai, Azai? Oh boy. Anaya, time to wake up, there he is. Azai, Anaya, time to wake up. Come. Jadya, it’s time to get up. Come. KJ, it’s time to wake up, KJ. It’s gonna be cold today, alright, just come out
of bed and get ready. I’m gonna work out real quick. Just get ready, okay? Oh man. Do everything you gotta do, okay? Everything you gotta do, okay? You okay? You’ll be okay, as long as you’re not bleeding. KJ, you all set, huh? – [KJ] I need a shirt. – Get one man. Go in your drawer. There’s not a shirt in there? – [KJ] I don’t know. – What’s wrong with that shirt? Rushing out to work. It is 7:10 and I gotta catch the D train and I am running late because of all the morning
stuff with the kids. I probably run late about
every other day at this point but yeah, morning times
are what they are, crazy. By the time I get to work, I done had a full day. That’s how it be feeling. (tapping) I don’t know the prep. We used to go out, down, turn. I can’t spot.
– Oh my God. – I don’t know how to spot and do it. I can spot doing Chaines turns but I’m not used to
spotting doing pirouettes. You supposed to lift up
but I don’t know how to, I’m used to doing my turns
like this without spotting. Students were laughing at me about that. I can turn mad times going that way but I do one pirouette turn
and I almost fall on my back, you know? How do they teach you? – Ah, dang.
– That was good. – But I can’t land at all. – [Khalid] It’s like
weird with the spot right? She got you like lifting?
– I can only do jazz turns. – [Khalid] How do you do jazz turns? – Basically how you were doing except you point your feet and you actually put your
whole foot to your knee. – Are you still in a passe when you do it? – Like this. – Oh, so you still doing the passe. – But it’s a lot easier to do a jazz turn, so much easier than the pirouette because
you have to turn around and spot. I guess you also have
to spot the jazz turn. Okay goodbye, I’m going to bed. – [Janille] Goodnight love. – I didn’t even know that
was called a jazz turn. (laughs) That’s funny? (laughs) – Welcome to the New York Jazz Workshop. (jazz music) – Today, I would like to discuss how you can play two, five,
one chord progressions. – Vocabulary, technique, ear training. – Lip flexibilities. – Dynamics, how soft you sing, how loud you sing. – You have to feel the music and have fun. (jazz music) – Well you can record this too but, so tomorrow, Jayda’s going to school and you’re gonna walk
her over to the train or, what time are you gonna get over there? So I can tell Misha so she can take her down
the rest of the way. – I mean as early as I need to. So that’d be like 7:15, if
we leave at seven on the dot. 15 minute walk. If Jayda can walk like I do, I can do it in 10 but probably be 15. That’s cool. Maybe I can pray with
her and stuff as we go. (sighs) – Uh oh. – Uh oh? – Misha may need to go into work early. – Uh oh. – So let me just try and see. – Gotcha. – I’m tired. I’m gonna go to bed, what time is it? 10:30, ugh. – I am so tired. I got home at like two in the morning and then had to wake up
early to get you guys up. I got less sleep than you. What is this? Oh, this is the email
thing that mommy set up? – [Jayda] Mmhmm. – Alright, so Monday, you feel okay trying this by yourself? Hmm?
– I think so. See look. – Oh. Alright. It’s 6:30 AM and I’m at the studio where I do all my classes,
my acting classes. And yeah, my partner, my scene partner, he knows my situation. He basically is always down
to practice early on Sundays. So we get in here like
6:30 in the morning, sometimes earlier. Couple times I’ve come here and he’s been here already just kind of like getting
in early and napping waiting for me to come through. And we just practice our scenes and, you know, basically talk about that dream of one day being able to do
this kind of work full time and not have to work the nine
to fives that we’re doing which I love my nine to five, I don’t hate it or anything but I also know that I’m an
artist, you know what I mean, and this is the work I
really want to do full time. On our way to church right now. – It’s not great lighting and my hair looks crazy. – It’s bad. I guess lighting’s not that great. – It’s terrible, let’s go from this side. – Okay. ♪ Wa, wa stick out my thumb ♪ ♪ Give me a piece of chewing gum ♪ ♪ Hush, I’m on the phone ♪ ♪ Do this, do that ♪ – Washington Square Park. – So today was an adventure day, supposed to be an adventure
day with our family. So we went to church and then after church, we took the kids on– – Bus tour. – Yeah a bus tour.
– Like some tourists. – Downtown bus tour because Anaya has been
asking to do this for years. Of course, what happened
is that Azai fell asleep and Anaya and KJ were basically saying–
– Basically played the whole time. They weren’t even looking at the sights. – So this is what parenting is basically. – In a nutshell.
– Showing your kids a good time, giving them a good experience and then all they really want to do is play with squirrels at the playground which is where we are now. – These kids are making
their Halloween baskets. It is our Hill family tradition to make special baskets
for collecting candy. Anaya, how are you doing with yours? – Not very good. (Janille laughs) – [Khalid] Azai, how are you doing? – [Azai] Who took my box? – [Khalid] No one took your box, you’re on your box right now. Hold still. – Okay. – [Khalid] Come here, come on. Alright. – Daddy, can you put some
lines on me like this? – Does this look like the picture? – Hold on, sit up. Hold on, KJ Put your shoes on, KJ KJ, put your shoes on. Face me.
– Daddy? – [Khalid] Yes, KJ? – Can you put some on me too? – [Khalid] Sure, sure. – Stop KJ, that’s disgusting. – About to go trick or treating. Let’s see what candy we can nab between now and when we get to
the main building we going to ’cause every year we go to this building, they be having mad candy. It’s a condo building
that our friend lives in. So we about to make it happen. Y’all ready? Let’s go. Come on, KJ, you ready? Let’s go. You ready? Come on, guys. Alright. – [KJ] Anaya, I’m scared. – [Janille] Careful guys. KJ, did you come over here? – We almost done trick or treating. It has been an event. Hey! I got to do dishes tonight. I’m tired. Just got done with my class. Class actually turned out alright. It’s a little bit weird because the building
that I was supposed to be teaching the class in ended up being, well the space was already booked, so me and a couple of students had to travel back to another building or the main building, I should
say, to teach that class. But it worked out though, you know? So right now, I guess I’m sort of
living a semi-free life while Janille is holding
it down with the kids and I gotta be honest, I always
feel guilty around this time because here it is I’m here in Boston and she’s stressed out with the kids. And we trade off and stuff like that, you know what I mean? Sometimes she’s occupied
on a Saturday or whatever and I’m the one that’s
holding it down with the kids but it’s different when I leave town, you know what I mean? I don’t know, I feel guilty, I guess even though I was making that money but it’s what it is. I’m on Newberry Street right now and it’s live, as you can see. It’s like being in the East Village or something in New York. But yeah, I’m about to have some solo time and spend some time with God is what I really need right now, you know what I mean? So. So that’s my struggle, you know? I’m trying to wear these hats and in order to wear these hats well, there’s sacrifice involved,
you know what I mean? Like I can’t be on the
wood like I want to be practicing all the time,
you know what I mean? If I’m gonna wear the daddy hat well and my husband hat well I gotta be around and if I’m around, I can’t be out there. But if I’m not out there, I sacrifice the grooming that
comes, you know what I mean? I don’t know, there’s just so many aspects of training and conditioning yourself as a dancer that I just don’t have time to do. So my river time is the only time I got. And honestly it’s not adequate enough for the performing that I do
end up getting hired to do so I’m usually never comfortable
when I have to perform. And it’s been that way for
the last six or seven years, maybe a little longer than that. I’ve been out of the game so long that I just don’t even get calls for real to do a lot of things
in the tap community. The calls that I do get are from connections I’ve
already had on my own but tap community, I’m invisible. And it fucks with me. Hey Azai. – [Janille] Khalid, what
does your shirt say? – Boom. – [Jayda] This is what
black fatherhood looks like. – [Khalid] That’s exactly what it says. – [Janille] This is true. – [Khalid] See the birds. – [Janille] Feeding pigeons
and squirrels in New York. – [Khalid] Hey Azai. – [Janille] What does your shirt say? – [Anaya] This is what
black fatherhood looks like. – [Khalid] That’s exactly what it says. – [Janille] This is true. – [Khalid] See the birds? – [Janille] Feeding pigeons
and squirrels in New York. – [Khalid] Boom. – [Ron] Meals on Wheels gives me a chance to be totally selfless. More than the food itself, a lot of seniors don’t have family. So just to have someone to talk to, just to say hey, how was your day, that means so much more
than a meal could ever mean. We have to look outside of ourselves, to be that lifeline to other people. It’s worth it. – [Male] Upright Bass, The
Musical Life and Legacy of Jamil Nasser, A Jazz Memoir. (jazz music) – Hi, I’m Zari Veres
Royal from Giant Steps and you’re watching The BeBop Channel. (holiday music) (gentle music) (jazz music) – [Male] What you doing, boy? – I’m trying to walk. – [Male] Oh, you trying to show
off in front of your girl– – Apologize. – [Female] Stop. – [Male] Apologize. – [Male] Apologize, apologize
on this? Get outta here Apologize, apologize on that. Come on man, let’s go, come on, come on. (jazz music) (rock music) (jazz music) (upbeat music) – It’s Sugar Ray time. – Oh come on, man, Jersey Joe Mike, baby. – Jersey Joe? – Jersey Joe, I put five dollars on it. – You’re gonna lose that five dollars. – Hey, where you say we’re going baby? – Boston, Philly, DC and Toronto. Now the tour starts next week but rehearsals start tonight. Make yourself at home boys. – [Male] Baby, here we go. – Do you mind? – Go ahead. ♪ You are the promise kiss of springtime ♪ – You playing that old shit? – What’s wrong with the old time shit? – Oh, nothing man but bebop
is the new jazz, okay. Bebop is the future. – That’s just the press talking. All I can see are three
mother fuckers in the room playing Duke’s shit. What makes their shit so different? – Because in here, bebop is about us. It informs the way we play. – To the newest member of our quartet. – And to Dizzy, whenever he gets here. – He’s coming. – So how come two of
America’s best jazz players haven’t played a single gig this year? I mean, brothers of your stature should be selling out concerts. – It’s the establishment, man. Our writers, the crooked ass club owners, the big time record labels. Yeah sure, we get high, we get drunk, man but when we hit that stage, man, the fans, they love us. Right Bird? – We’ve had our moments. – Like Lover Man? – What about it? – July 29th, ’46. – [Charlie] Good memory. – That’s my favorite record of yours man. – Why? – Because of the feeling in it, how you just let it all fucking out. I remember I was doing this gig with Hamp, Lionel Hampton, we were just a couple blocks off Sunset. Word travels fast, you know? The day after, all every jazz cat in LA could talk about was how Charlie Parker was
recording Lover Man for Dial. – I must’ve had a quart of
whisky in me that night. – How’d you do it? – Look man, if you don’t live it, it ain’t gonna come through your horn. – [Male] Come on, Bird, sit down, man. – Oh shit. We gotta hit this. (pounding on door) Dizzy’s here. – [Mingus] Who? – You think you know jazz, Mingus? (jazz music) – Dr. Jeff Gardere from Giant Steps and you’re watching The BeBop Channel. – [Announcer] Attention travelers, next Tuesday, a major power outage will cause complete chaos
throughout the city. Food, water and phone service
will be in short supply. There will likely be panic city wide. Stand clear of the closing doors please. – [Female] Disasters don’t plan ahead. You can. Talk to your loved ones about how you’re going to
be ready in an emergency. Don’t wait, communicate. (jazz music) – Welcome to the New York Jazz Workshop. (jazz music) – Today, I would like to discuss how you can play two five
one chord progressions. – Vocabulary, technique, ear training. – Lip flexibilities. – Dynamics, how softly you
sing, how loud you sing. – You have to feel the music and– – Have fun. (saxophone music) – Okay, so these are
the guys I worked with. In LA, we was doing Ain’t Misbehavin’, Marshal Royal was the saxophonist, Bennie Powell, trombone, Al Aarons, trumpet, Jerome Richardson, that’s me and Larry Ball. I was right out of high school and these are all the old cats who worked with Count
Basie and a lot of folks during that time. So my dad taught me well. He taught me how to play jazz
and play swing, swing music. Those are the cats. (piano music) ♪ Somebody help me ♪ ♪ I’m locked inside my
fear and my sadness ♪ ♪ Lost inside my head,
I’m tossed and I’m torn ♪ ♪ It’s madness and I’m so confused ♪ ♪ I needed your help ♪ ♪ Somebody help me ♪ – The Skillet Show! (upbeat jazz music) I am the Reverend Dr. Severin Roundtree. I am Frankie Mahoney, a crooner from Mendover, Nevada. Here, my card. Oh, what a shock.
– A crossdresser. – Oh, give me that, wrong card – The woman you’re looking for is standing right here. – Where? (upbeat jazz music) – Ken’s a playwright, I’m a playwright. Ken’s a musician, I’m not a musician but I do write some music and he makes sense of it and puts it together, arrange it and that kind of stuff. And I direct but he’s not really a director. So that’s kind of my part and then I do most of
the administrative work at all of the administrative work–
– All administrative. I can’t stand administrative work, I can’t stand that. – But what we both do
is we both are actors. And so we do both know
theater inside and out some from one perspective a
little more than the other. So where I’m directing actors–
– I’m the music guy. – He’s always the music director. – But I can act too though. – Yeah, he can act but you can’t act and be musical
director at the same time. So that’s what we’ve done. So we’ve put together, All God’s Saints was
one of the first shows that we did together. The book was already written and then Ken rewrote
all the music, 26 songs. – Was it 26? – Yeah, 26 songs.
– 26 songs. – And it was a gospel musical. – All gospel. – But some kind of jazzy parts into it because well, that’s what he is, he’s a jazz guy. – We did at the Producer’s Club. – Yeah, Producer’s Club. – And that’s the last time we did it and we had all those people. I said, “I’m not doing this again,” not with all these people. We had so many.
– 26 actors in all. Trying to get them
acting, dancing, singing and when you put a lot of actors and you don’t have a budget, then you get what you can get and boy you gotta work real hard to try to get everybody
together in shape harmonizing. It was no easy task. But we were able to pull it off and we did more than 10 shows and we did four or five different places where we kind of took the show around and were invited to other places where we didn’t have to
produce it ourselves. So that was nice. – We scaled it back and did a
version called Martin’s Song, one of the characters in All
God’s Saints Go To Heaven Not– – Yeah, where we just
focused on the main character and with HIV/AIDS and we promoted that as an HIV/AIDS– – But it’s a little better
’cause you had less people. – Four people. – We had four actors and it’s much better to
what’s the word for it? To regulate. – Regulate? It was easier to direct,
to work with and schedules you have to regulate all them
folks.. and the choreography.. – So it was just four actors. So we took part of the music and Terry just focused
on that one character. And that was a little better, it was a little better. We did it at some churches and some HIV kind of things. – Yeah, HIV promotions and the good part about that is that we didn’t really, as producers, didn’t have to really come out of pocket because that was a producible show that people didn’t mind–
– Right ’cause folks don’t want a lot
of people in the show. It’s hard to get a show produced when you got 26 actors. It’s a lot of work. So most shows that they
produce is small cast, they want a small cast, they want to be able to go
a lot of different places and not spend a lot of money. If they got to spend a lot of money, they’re not gonna deal with it. – Well not just that. They want something that’s
gonna speak to people and Martin’s Song had a lot
of pertinent storylines in it in terms of people at
church working together actually caring for each other as well as helping people. So you got somebody like Martin who was homeless and in need and you got somebody in
the church who’s arrogant and nose is all stuck up in the air and they feel like it’s beneath them to deal with a homeless person, that’s something that strikes
a chord with churches. And so there was a lot of
teachable moments in there, not to mention the fact that Iris House and other places that dealt with HIV/AIDS awareness were very happy to have us
as part of their affairs and a part of their symposiums and workshops that they were doing to promote more awareness
for African Americans, especially in Harlem ’cause that’s where we
did the show the most. – Right, Harlem. Then we segued into, what did we do next? – No, we did Bone’s Venture which was a completely opposite. This was his baby. He thought it was just gonna
be a small little show. – But it was a lot of people and we had a lot of problems with that. – Why did I let him– – And the subject matter was a little– – Racy. – Yeah, it’s pretty racy about these two Polish guys who were– – At a brothel, starting a brothel. – Right, they were ex porn, they were ex porn filmmakers. – Can’t do that in church. – Right, so it was limited. Then I had Geoffrey Owens help me with it and help me to really make the music much, later on make the music much better. We did that show too. – We did that show– – At the Hartley House. – We did that show but he kind of left me
alone with that show a lot ’cause he was traveling
doing a theater show touring. And then I wound up doing most of it. He thought it was just gonna
be a small little show– – But it wasn’t. – No, it’s not, it was a big show, another 24 people– – No, it wasn’t 24, it was 12. – Yes, it was, no, it
was far more than that. I’ll show you the– – Well anyway, we did that. Then Geoffrey Owens helped me with it, we did a reading later on–
– Later on when we revamped it when he revamped it. – Right, but then, when
they say that God says, what do you have in your hand? So we did the Skillet and
Booker we had that school. – A middle school called The Forward School of Creative Writing, forward film, orchestration, writing, art, recording and drama. And so when we were doing that school, the kids had to write all of the scripts from the 128 state standards. And so it was an educational program. And as principal of that school, I had the opportunity to act in it, that gave me a chance to
get out from behind the desk in administration and do some acting. And that show was, we did about 14 episodes over two years, 14 or 15 episodes over two years. People started saying that Miss Booker, who was my character, was really hilarious and his character,
Skillet, was crazy funny. So people kept telling
us how funny we were. So when we finally left the school, left education and we
went to a family reunion and they said they need
some entertainment. So for fun, we decided let’s go and do a little Skillet and Booker. So we did an improv and I tell you it went over so well and then unbeknownst to
us, some kid cries out in the middle of the
thing, “It’s Skillet.” And we were like, what? He recognized us from the TV or recognized him from the TV. And so then people started saying, you guys got something there. So we started writing little skits. – Terry wrote this script and I just kind of like
added some things to it, some characters, and part of one of my
other shows that I wrote and we came up with this,
Matters of the Heart show which is much easier. It’s just us two doing the whole show. We got eight characters
between the two of us. We doing the whole show together. So we ain’t got to worry
about somebody saying, “I got to do an audition,” this and that and that and this. So we did open mics at the comedy clubs. – Yeah, we went to all comedy
clubs all around New York. – And Chicago. – And Chicago. And we went to comedy clubs in Chicago and we developed a little following. People started saying,
“Hey, it’s those two.” – We did that show at the
Hartley House for three years. Then we went up to Comic Strip Live. You know Comic Strip Live? That’s where Eddie Murphy and
all of them guys started off. And then you had Adam Sandler doing, he did a show up there and then Seinfeld. So it’s a good spot we just did. Then we did six shows there, right Terry, over the course of a couple of years? – Yeah. They started liking us over there but it’s kind of hard to get people to want to spend a lot of
money at a comedy club. – You gotta do the two drink minimum and the cover charge and us folks don’t like
to spend that money. We like to get stuff free. – Yeah, yeah. But in any case, now we’re doing our show at a restaurant. We got a six month contract that we’re doing our show at a restaurant, Spoon Fed in Manhattan and
we don’t have to produce it. – Right. So it’s getting better. – We are getting to the place where we’re stopping
having to self produce and that feels good. – Yeah. So get a little 3D y’all, am I coming through your
TV? Skillet and Booker And that’s it.
– Mr. Mahooney. – Look here,y’all come
on out there to Spoon Fed and see Skillet and Booker
in Matters of the Heart. – Miss Booker’s waiting for you. – Ciao. – See ya. – Sorry y’all, I’m eating a little bit. Come here, let me show you this. And so here’s my Wall of Fame. Little Beanie is behind me, my dog. Here, Ain’t Misbehavin’, I did a million of those and this was in San Diego. This is when we did it again. It was on Broadway and one of the shows I did, it was signed by everybody, Nell Carter, it was signed by Andre Deshields and all the people that was on the show, the originals I worked with them. Okay, everybody signed it,
Luther Henderson, all of them. Then let’s see here’s The Wiz. I did that on the road. My first show was A Chorus Line. I was about oh 18, 19 years
old when I was doing that show. I did it in Chicago and I did it in New York also, subbed on it, then I had
all the people sign that. Here’s another show I did. Beanie is with me here. Something I did in Europe. We was in Europe for nine months. And then over here, Ain’t
Misbehavin’ with Frenchie Davis and Ruben Studdard. This is one of the shows I did, well, it was a movie, A Soldier’s Story. It was when Denzel Washington, he first became a star. He wasn’t a star then. So I played on the soundtrack
to that movie in LA. And I did Sophisticated Ladies here. That’s the one that
was with Gregory Hines. I had all of them to sign that. Isn’t that something? There you go. All the shows I did. Oh I forgot about this
one, Ella with Freda Payne, Maurice Hines. Music has been a big part of my life. I started at a very young age. And there’s my brother Junior. We worked as kids, played drum solos, played
all over the place. He was a great drummer in Chicago, nobody could touch him, great jazz drummer. I was about three years
old when I started. He was seven. And so we played all over the place. My dad’s a drummer. My dad worked with Muddy Waters back in the ’40s when he first came to Chicago and they wrote, they came to talk to my dad and they put his name in the book. Can’t be Satisfied, Muddy Waters. So now I am continuing
the tradition of drummers. So I think that is my, that was my calling to continue the tradition
of my brother and my father. They’re not playing anymore. My dad, he’s 93, he’s not playing gigs of course and my brother had a nervous breakdown. So I’m the one who’s continuing
on the tradition. The Trad.. (soft piano music) ♪ Somebody help me ♪ ♪ I’m locked inside my
fear and my sadness ♪ ♪ Lost inside my head ♪ ♪ I’m tossed and I’m torn ♪ ♪ It’s madness ♪ ♪ And I’m so confused ♪ ♪ I needed your help ♪ – Hey, I’m Marist Veres Royal, the kid from Giant Steps and I want you to tell all your friends to watch The BeBop Channel and if you don’t, this is
what’s gonna happen to you. I will find you. (laughing) ♪ Avocado is the game ♪ ♪ If you lose, I change your name ♪ ♪ M-I-C-K-E-Y-P ♪ – [Postal Worker] Hey, I got a package for y’all to go inside with. Hey wait a minute, y’all
working with them inside right? – Yeah, this our summer job, skin tights. (jazz music) – Where is that mother fucker? His flight came in over an hour ago. – Traffic, La Guardia, what can you say? – Hmm, man Duke Jordan died. (saxophone music) Man, Sam Brown died too? – Icewater, do you have to
take up the whole front seat? How long are we living
together, five years? Me and Mickey, 25. All that time I never asked you, what made you pick the sax? – Simple, I was first
in line on music day. Back in them days in elementary school, you had to be on time or you’d get stuck playing
with the trombone or the tuba or some shit like that, ain’t that right, Mick? – Damn, I can’t believe how many people have fallen off the planet. – At last y’all had instruments, not like these kids up here now. – True that. And Bass never let a day go by without reminding us how lucky we were to have his old broke down
ass as our music teacher. Aint that right, Mick? Playing that shit is not without cost. I remember this girl told me, she wasn’t gonna be seen talking to me unless I could play better
than Maceo and the J.B.’s. Said she wasn’t gonna be
seen with nobody skating. So you know what I did? I said, you know what I did? – What, what’d you do?
– What? – I said ♪ Get up, get on up ♪ ♪ Get up, get on ♪ (laughing) Oh man, back in them days in DC, there used to be this club called Rands over there near the old bus station. Man we used to be in there funking it up. We played jazz too but that was our late night shit. – Over 30 musicians died in the last year. Unbelievable. – There he goes. – [Icewater] Man, we oughta jump his ass. – Whoop that ass.
– Punk ass mother fucker. – Punk ass mother fucker. – Look fellas, we need him. We’ve got $500,000. That’s a lot of cash but it’s not gonna get
us where we need to go. – Fuck him. Central bank printing mother fuckers. That 500K might as well be $50. – Oh, I missed you. – I never thought in a million years, we’d be graveling to this mother fucker. – Look like you been putting a
little something something on since I’ve been gone. – Yeah but that boy can play, Bass. – Man, when we get in there, just let me do the talking. We got to set him up so he’ll go for it. – Shit, after three weeks
in Europe, I missed this. – Look, mother fucker’s so late, I gotta wait for alternate
side of the street parking. – I missed you. I feel like you’re always traveling. One minute you’re here and then you’re gone again. – You wait, alright? ‘Cause you’re just gonna
piss him off anyway. – True. What you want me to do? I mean, work in Harlem for $50 a night? That shit is just plain disrespectful, you know what I’m saying? Plus, we going through the 500,000 Big Daddy just gave us. – [Male] Did you hear that? – And with these financial terrorists central bank money printing
like Monopoly mother fuckers, shit that valued at 500,000 go poof just like that overnight. – So then maybe we could start thinking about doing something else, diversify what you do so we don’t run through
the money, like teach. – What? No, no, no, no, no. See, I play, that’s what I do. (jazz music) – I know that’s what you do but I left what I do for you, my family, my friends. I’m stuck here alone waiting for you all the time. – I don’t want to talk
about this right now. – We’re gonna talk about it now. – [Male] We’re getting a show. – I did a lot to get you that money, to get us that money. – [Mickey] Uh oh, I
knew this was gonna be– – Shh. – Let me tell you something baby, Big Daddy, Mr. Big Daddy, CEO Big Daddy, whatever the fuck his
little ass name is, okay, he gave me and the old man
500,000 for our tracks. So if you really think about it, you ain’t really, you know, you ain’t, you ain’t do shit. – Oh really, are you serious? – Damn. – If it hadn’t been for me singing poorly on Mickey’s track, that old man would’ve been better off. He would’ve won and not you. – Whatever. – Alright then, so how about I give Mr. Big Daddy a call, tell him what you’ve been up to? Breach of contract or a little tort might just get– – As funny as this shit is, she’s about to screw our lottery ticket. – Hey. – [Chuck] Come on, baby. – [Kim] I helped you and got you paid and now I want you to help me. – I know what you want. I know what this is all about. – All this other bullshit needs to stop. – It’s about that little trip, right? That little trip you wanted to take. I’m sorry alright, I mean look, didn’t I get you that job at the Jazz Foundation? – Yeah with those old ass people. – We’ll take it, as soon as
I get back from tour, okay? 500,000 richer. Shit, I’ll cancel the shit right now, is that what you want? – I want a house, I want a ring, I want a wedding. Oh yeah, a big wedding. – [Both] Oh shit. – There goes our money. – Women love shopping. – Just got to figure out
a way that I can play and not have to do as much
travel. You’ll get your dream I’ll get mine. We gonna work it out. (knocking on door) Damn, Three Stooges
man, Mickey, Manny and, where the hell is Blacky? What the hell you all doing at my crib? – Just let them in. – Look man, we’re here to propose a truce and run something by you and by the looks of it, it just might be something
you’re interested in. – Man, we’re opening up
a joint on 135th street, you want in? Hey man, I like gorgeous women, fine cars, nice threads way too much to risk all these winnings. – Look Chucky, the music is dying up here north of 125th. Lenox Lounge is closed. (jazz music) – [Mickey] Mark Four, Blue Book, Club Baron and St. Nick’s Pub, they’re all gone. – How much are we talking about, Mickey? – We got the spot on 135th
Street, the old Hudson Club, needs a lot of work but look, why don’t you
stop by once you get settled and we can discuss the numbers then? – Mickey, guys, no hard feelings, right? – Alright, look fellas, it’s time for y’all to go. I’mma stop through later, alright? Come on, get you Manny Mo
ass out my crib, let’s go. I’ll see y’all. (upbeat music) – [Mickey] Back in the
day, I was smooth as silk, black man, look at me. There wasn’t a club I didn’t play where they didn’t know what time it was. Playing with Art Blakey
and the Jazz Messengers, Sonny Rollins, Jackie McLean, yeah, I’ve come a long way, all the way to– – Oh hey.
– What’s up, boss? – [Mickey] Okay, get back to work. – Yeah, get your asses back to work before I serve my foot up your asses.
– Stupid little kid. – You get your stupid ass out of here. – [Mickey] Look what the dog dragged in. Boy, I haven’t seen you in a coon’s age. – A mind is a terrible thing to waste. Hi y’all, I’m Dr. Jeff. Now you probably know me
as America’s psychologist but I’m also one of
Mickey’s oldest friends and we were running back on 82nd Street on the Upper West Side. I was taking piano lessons from him, we were running around
and smoking a little herb and looking at women’s behinds, you know all the stuff
that we shouldn’t be doing, especially as a budding psychologist. But Mickey and I, we had
a kind of a falling out and I’m going to be the bigger man and put that behind us by congratulating Mickey on your new spot. – Look like I finally got
across the finish line. I don’t know how much longer
I’mma be on the planet. Did you know that Jackie McLean died and Freddie Hubbard died? – Mickey, are you going
to go down that path, that dark path again? Do you know how much time you’ve wasted? Mickey, I’m here on a
philanthropic mission and as you know, I’m the director of the
Jazz Elders Foundation and we’re doing a fall fundraiser, Mickey. One of my employees
actually pulled my coat and said that you had this spot. So here I is. – You know I got you. – Thanks Mickey. – [Mickey] Just let me know when. – I know, I know, Mickey. – Did you know that Ben Riley died? – I wish you’d stop looking at that damn phone all the time. Who else has died? This OCD with the darkness and people dying, it’s gotta stop. You need to come to my office. You know the drill, front and center next week. – I know the deal all too well. Get that smug look off your face. Talking about me. Check yourself, make sure you got two. – Yeah, I do and if I wasn’t a respected member of the mental health community, I would tell you to
kiss my brown pimply ass you mullet-mouthed, woody
woodpecker, cocksucking oldish Gambino numbing mother fucker. I’ll be there. – Yeah right. (jazz music) Like I told you, it’s gonna take a lot of work but it’ll be alright. – What the hell is he doing here? You want me to take him? – Marist! – Man, get out of here. It’s gonna take a lot of work. Exactly how does this work? – So here’s what we got, with the house band and all the cats, they’ve agreed to work for $50 a night. staff, minimum plus tips. – Gonna take a minute or two to even think about a liquor license. In the meantime, the lease is 2,700 bucks a month. – 2,700? Man, I get a nice little
apartment in Manhattan. – $100,000 in the pot, 25% stake with a three percent
option, that’s the deal? – Tell you what man, 200,000, 50% stake, three year option. I get a say in whoever’s getting booked
up in this joint, man and I headline here from time to time when I’m in town. Final counter. Take that or leave it. – Deal. – [Mickey] We’ve got a deal. – It’s a deal. And look man, keep your
eyes off my girl, alright? Keep that little crusty ass
knarly toe man, out the cradle and one foot in the
grave where it belongs. – Look, I was in Baghdad while you were still in your dad’s bag. – [Chuck] Fellas, we
got a serious problem. First, I see little kids
out there saying it. ♪ M-I-C-K-E-Y-P-L ♪ – [Chuck] Then you got people from the media saying it.
– I’m Zaire from WTVG and I’m outside of new club, Mickey’s Place on 135th street. – [Chuck] Then I’m looking
at this dumb ass sign. Man, what the hell is
this man, Mickey’s place? – What, they spell it wrong or something? – Funny as fuck, cue ball. – No, he just bent out of shape ’cause it doesn’t say Chuck’s place. – You know what? Why shouldn’t it say Chuck’s place, man? Shit, I’m the future. – Man listen, you got Mickey here, 50 years of history behind his name. He done played on every continent, all the musicians, one of our senior soldiers. What you got, Instapic or Instagram or whatever the hell that shit is? – What I got is my foot
in your funky ass, Mukaka. – What’d you call me? – Hold on, hold on. – I’m holding man, man hold that noise down back there, man. First of all, man, I own half this shit. You know what? Who the hell are y’all anyway? When y’all ilk took over
man, jazz was on top. Duke Ellington was like a God. Train’s Love Supreme, went platinum, man and Buhaina, Art Blakey, he
was like a household name, man. Don’t nobody know shit about jazz now ’cause y’all done fucked this shit up. – The boy does have a point. – So what are we gonna call
it, Chuck and Mickey’s? Bass and Ass. – That shit sounds boodie. – Look man, we gonna
settle this thing like men, with a wager. – What, like you can’t spell
A flat half diminished? – A flat, C flat, E double flat, G flat, don’t try me Bass. I’m serious, man. I’mma race you. – What? Like you’re in some high
school, mother fucker, we’re gonna have a race? Since we are so old, serious? Mickey is 74, that wouldn’t be a fair fight. So you race Icewater, 100 yards. – [Chuck] Alright man, you got a deal. – [Mickey] And just one more thing, the loser has to play in the house band to help cut costs. And that’s just between me and you. (jazz music) – [Chuck] Wait a minute, why’d
you agree to this so quick? And what was you saying in his ear, man? – [Mickey] As you can see,
Ice is in pretty good shape, he ran the 100, in under 9 seconds – Man, you lying, man. Usain Bolt can’t run
100 in under 9 seconds. 100 meter, 100 yards. Damn. (jazz music) – You know, Mickey, certainly you’re a great musician, you’ve played with great musicians but as your therapist I have to tell you, you seem to keep going down this path as to the music dying that there’s been a bad ending to it, that the people that you
work with are all gone and it makes me really wonder whether at this point, you are experiencing
some sort of a depression because you’re only looking
at the negativity of this instead of what’s really now
coming up through the jazz. And so we’re gonna keep
talking about that. (jazz music) – Playing this shit is not without cost. I remember this girl told me she wasn’t gonna be seen talking to me unless I could play better
than Maceo and the J.B.’s. Said she wasn’t gonna be
seen with nobody skating. So you know what I did? I said, you know what I did? – What?
– What, what’d you do? – I said ♪ Get up, get on up ♪ ♪ Get up, get on ♪ (saxophone music) – I remember dad, you and mom got this
car with a hatch back. I said I’d be happy to give you the money to get a really great car and you said, “Well
no, this works for me.” I says, “Why?” “Because it’s the right
height to put the meals in. (laughs) Dad, tell me when you first got an inkling about Meals on Wheels. – There was kind of an abandoned house. That’s where we got started
with Meals on Wheels. We kind of filled a need for
people as they got older. – It’s the human interaction that probably fed them
much more than the food. – Oh yeah. When you can see somebody else benefiting by your life in some way, you can’t help but feel
good about it I think. – Well the reason I’m involved, dad, is because you are and you’re so inspiring. How you’ve impacted people is enormous. – [Female] Drop off a warm meal and get more than you expect. Volunteer at americaletsdolunch.org. – [Both] America, let’s do lunch. – Welcome to the New York Jazz Workshop. (jazz music) – Today, I would like to discuss how you can play two, five,
one chord progressions. – Vocabulary, technique, ear training. – Lip flexibilities. – Dynamics, how softly you sing, how loud you sing. – You have to feel the music and– – Have fun. (jazz music) – I think the thing that’s frustrating about being a tap dancer
in this world today is that it’s this feeling
that I’m by myself like I’m alone, like I’m the only one who is trying to groom myself as a dancer and get this work and have raised four kids. It’s hard. (tapping) (drumming) – It’s a very, very difficult thing. I don’t think anyone for centuries has ever really put their finger on it. It’s like falling in love. I don’t think you can
talk about it in words. For me, playing the saxophone, the whole approach to
it is just to be able to transcend the instrument so that there’s no sense of
separation between the two. (jazz music) When I play something or practice it, I don’t just go and start
playing scales or whatever. I go and I meditate. I always play it in my mind before I ever play a note. (saxophone music) What’s important for me to capture is this selflessness. (jazz music) You’re in the present. You’re no longer aware of
your own identity or whatever. When you hit that zone, then you can play anything. You don’t have to worry
about what the notes are. You don’t even have to
know what the notes are. It’s just sound and emotion and feeling and conversation with the people you’re playing with. It’s a very intuitive kind of thing where things happen that
seem kind of magical. (jazz music) You’re just following the flow of ideas. That’s where you want to live. That’s where you can really create and connect with other
people in abstract ways. (jazz music) There’s so many things that I’ve kind of done research on and that I find really interesting that I haven’t been able to necessarily work through yet and to incorporate into my improvising. I will probably be doing
this till the day I die and exploring it because it is so interesting and there’s virtually no end to what you can do. It’s just a matter of doing it. I can’t see how I would ever get bored. (jazz music) I think jazz matters because it ultimately gets to the core of what we are and who
we are as human beings. It is a music that is
based on an individual’s freedom to express themselves and yet to function within a community, to work together towards a goal that’s bigger than yourself and being able to
connect with other people in a non-verbal way because words can’t express so many things about being alive. (jazz music) All I’m concerned with is just to continue to create and hopefully something will come out that people connect with. If I’m connected with it and if I like it, hopefully some other people will. And if I’m able to do that, then I’m a happy man. (saxophone music) (jazz music) – [Ron] Meals on Wheels gives me a chance to be totally selfless. More than the food itself, a lot of seniors don’t have family. So just to have someone to talk to, just to say, hey, how’s your day, that means so much more
than meal could ever mean. We have to look outside of ourselves to be that lifeline to other people. It’s worth it. (saxophone music) – Hey love. How’d the audition go? – Lonnie, there were like 14
other girls there, all fake. This one girl even skipped
right past the line ’cause she was all besties
with the producer or something. So annoying. – Look, Lydia, you’ve
been through this before. Come on, you never know
until they call, right? – It was a basketball love story. I was 5’5 and these girls were over 5’10. Who would you choose? (laughs) – Come on, you know I
don’t play it like that. – I know.
– It’s all good. – Hey, let’s go to the Electric Room, hmm? – Now? – Yes, now. I want some cocktails. We’ll have Chinese food, sleep in. – Lydia, come on, you know I have that gig at
Fine Arts tomorrow night. You didn’t forget about the gig, did you? – No. – [Lonnie] I reserved a table for you. – Do you ever look at my Instagram? Do you have any idea how
unlucky I’ve been recently? – I don’t even have Instagram. – You don’t have a damn clue, do you? – Look, if anything, we’re
lucky to have each other. – We’re lucky? Where’s your gig money really going? – [Lonnie] We can spend extravagantly when I’m selling out clubs and you’re acting in big movies. – But why don’t you
just work a nine to five like everyone else? – You see, this is why I
never get anything done. – Oh, you never get anything done? You’re home all day practicing while I’m working in some office. You think I want to be in an office auditioning at night because I can’t make
anything during the day? – We’re gonna have to argue
about this some other time because I am tired of you yelling at me like I’m some kind of child. – Now you’re saying
that I’m yelling at you? How dare you patronize me like that? – [Lonnie] You know what? – What? See you don’t have anything else to say because nothing you’re saying makes sense. I’m asking you for one night
to support me, one night. I support you all the time. One night. (saxophone music) – What will it be, young brother? – A double. – A double what? – A double anything. (laughs) – You did pretty good on that thing. I’m surprised you haven’t
played here before. – I guess I move around a bit. – Trailblazer, I see. Well I’m looking forward
to your set tonight. Mr. Lonnie… – Johnson. – Lonnie Johnson, that’s
right, Lonnie Johnson. Lonnie, it’s Thursday, you know what that means? – Can’t say that I do. – Grad students, plenty of ’em. – Ah, the mod squad. Alright, well I hope they like Bird. – Woo, a God ahead of his time. Boy, the music just
ain’t what it used to be. It’s all Boney James,
Kenny G, Najee, BS nowadays Too soft, too precise, nobody tells a story. – [Adela] Bonjour, my friend. – Madam Adela. What can I get for you? – A dark and stormy please, Art. – That you are sugar, that you are. – So, who is the lady? – Oh, that’s my saxophone. Just something some of the
guys in the band thought up. – You are playing here tonight? – Yeah, first time. – What kind of music do you play? – Jazz. – Oh wonderful. Do you play your own songs? – Sometimes, occasionally although I like to pay
homage to the greats. – Ah, like Louis Armstrong
playing Broadway tunes. – Ah, you know your history? – And a few other things. – So you study around here? – I moved here in January. I just graduated from Boston University. – Ah, you went to BU? So did I. – Cool. – What’d you major in, fashion? – Oh no, dance theater, ballet. – Well that’s my call. I’m Lonnie. – Adela. Pleasure to meet you both. – Oh right. Well, stick around for the show. – I will. – [Male] So how is this kid? – He’s magical. I caught his act up at
The Beacon up in Boston, simply amazing. Say, while you’re here, how ’bout that interview
for the newsletter? Come on, front page, front page. – Some other time. – Oh geez. – Thank you, thank you and
welcome to Fine Arts Jazz. My name is Art and my wife thinks I’m pretty damn fine which I’m sure you all agree. Now tonight, I bring to
you a multi-talented group all the way from Boston, Mass. Making their live debut in the big city, Lonnie Johnson and the Black Willows. (audience applause) – Wow, we are really
feeling the love tonight. Thank you all so much for coming out. Unfortunately, we forgot to
wear our signature Red Sox hats. (audience booing) I know, I know, disappointing but really seriously, we have some great music
for you guys tonight. Please just sit back, relax and enjoy. (jazz music) – Excuse me, Lonnie, Lonnie Johnson, my name’s Nate Carlton. I’m with Q Records out in Los Angeles. – Nate Carlton. Q Records, I heard of you guys, producing some classic stuff out there. – We’re also on the
hunt for some new blood. – Really? – Yeah, it’s about as real as it gets and what you were playing
tonight was pretty amazing. Give me a call in the morning. – I will. Thanks. – And once again, it’s a pleasure
listening to you tonight. – Are you good to go, Lonnie? Okay, this is Lonnie Johnson,
after fema, take one. (jazz music) So I’m guessing little miss drama queen hasn’t crawled back yet, huh? Listen, you know how it is man. We gotta get this done, time is money. Let’s go. (jazz music) – [Lonnie] Hold up, Ed, let’s take five. – [Male] Upright Bass, The
Musical Life and Legacy of Jamil Nasser, A Jazz Memoir. (jazz music) – Yeah, Sid man, yeah I’m
just doing my thing man. I’m not cutting into your time, am I? – Oh no, not at all. Papa here told me you was coming in and I just wanted to check out what you’re working on, man. Where’s your band at? – Man, between us, I might have a shot with Q Records. Just trying to cut this tight demo. – A shot with Q Records? Are you messing with me, Lonnie? – He Sid you two should do a duet about Lonnie’s troubles
with the ladies, man. (laughs) – Wow, so Lydia’s giving you
a hard time again, huh? Dude, she’s not worth the stress, man, trust me, I know. It’s like time for you
to find someone else. – That simple? – Hell yeah, it’s that simple. In fact, I got the perfect girl in mind, she digs jazz too. – Word, who’s that? – My cousin Jean, she’s an event planner. I don’t have any pictures and stuff on her but just trust me, I got you. She’s cute, you’ll see. I guaran damn tee it, man. I’mma set it up tomorrow.
– Word, my man. – For lunch at Brooklyn Fet
on Ocean Avenue for noon. Be there and thank me later, man. – Drink, sir? – Yeah, pimm’s cup. Thanks. – You must be Lonnie. I’m Janea, Sidney’s cousin. OMG, you are such a cutie. So my company does all the super hot, super elite night spots in the city which is cool, you know, ’cause the city is the place to be. Ha! I know everyone. I mean I have to know everybody or else it doesn’t work. Anyway, I enjoy it. Oh, and did I mention that we get gigs for models, artists and actors also? Oh my God, you are so cute. So what did Sidney say about moi? Give me one moment, please. Oh my God, Lyrical Soul
is postponing her show at the Marriott tonight. Give me a second, let me tell this tramp to cough up the cancellation fee. Send, done and back to us. So was Sidney right? Am I your cup of tea or whatever? Ha! – [Art] Uh oh, it’s got to be a lady. – [Lonnie] Man I just got off a date. – [Art] How’d it go? – Let’s just say she wasn’t my cup of tea. (laughs) – Well there are three things that could mess up a musician, money, fame and women. – You got that right. – How’s that ex of yours doing? She still in the picture? – It’s complicated. – It always is, my brother. – Man, things would’ve been different if she knew about my opportunity. – Oh yeah, the recording contract. Well it sounds like to me she was in it for the wrong
reasons anyway, my man. It’s time to get out of the past, get with the now. Cliche but true. – Bonjour, Art. – Bonjour, hello. – My show is this coming Friday. – Oh! – Will you come please? – Oh look at that, I wouldn’t miss it for the world. – Fantastic, merci. Bonjour, quiet man. – Not one of his better days. – Maybe this might cheer him up. – Maybe. – Goodbye, mes amis. – Bye bye, sugar. Now this could be the remedy you need. Like you’ve got better things to do. An open mind is a
healthy mind, my brother. It’ll be worth your while. Look and I’ll pay for the ticket. Gee, go on. (audience applause) (jazz music) – Wow, that was amazing. So I gotta ask you something. – Oh, a question, what is it? – Where did you learn to dance like that? – Well, my mother was a teacher and she taught tap jazz in Paris. – In Paris? – Yes, while in Paris. I’d sit in her class after
school and I would watch. At first I wasn’t interested but the more I kept watching, the more– – The more you thought you could be better than any of them? – It was just beautiful. The experience, the movement and how they could express themselves. – I see. I guess we can be a bit
competitive over here. – It’s true. But there’s nothing wrong with wanting to be the
best at what you do. It’s one of the reasons
why I came to America. So how did you start playing? – Well for me, it was my dad. He used to play sax with
Ramsey Lewis in the heyday. He’d be on tour. I wouldn’t see him much but when he was home, he would practice for hours. I guess that kind of rubbed off on me. – The sax is beautiful. – Yeah, I love all instruments. They all have their own vibe and their own personality but the sax, it just speaks soul. I like to sing too but trust me, you don’t want to hear that. (laughs) But seriously, I guess
that’s where I get my voice, the saxophone. It just makes me happy. – Is music all your whole life? – I thought it was till recently. – I guess we will continue this next time. – Well you know, actually, there’s a great place we can go if you want to maybe get some cocktails. It’s usually pretty quiet. – I’d love to but I’m just so exhausted. – Ah come on, you can’t be that tired. – Well a bar might be too much right now. – Well look, I have another idea. It’s a warm night and I know a certain young lady
that would like to join us. (jazz music) (saxophone music) (clapping) – It’s so wonderful up here. – You should see it
out here in the autumn. It’s beautiful, fire up the grill, make some marshmallows. – Mmm, marshmallows. That day I came to the bar, you seemed pretty upset. What happened? – Yeah sorry about that. That night we played at
Art’s, my girl left me. Seemed like the only thing
that ever mattered to her was her acting and that I keep her entertained. Anyway, we don’t have to talk about that. – I understand but I don’t think you let much come between you and your lady. Am I right? – I suppose so. – You want it pretty bad, don’t you? – I do, whatever it is. The music business is changing in ways that I have no control over but when people come to hear my band live, all the nonsense just fades
away and it’s just pure. – My mother always said, “Dance like nobody’s watching.” And I always think about that. I want to feel connected, I want to feel a connection. I want someone to see me, someone who really
understands in a deeper way. (phone ringing) – Lonnie, Nate Carlton here. – Mr. Carlton, hey, how’s it going? – Fantastic, thanks. So I finally got a chance to listen to your tracks last night. Absolutely amazing. – Really? Wow. I don’t know what to say. – Well, your contract is
being drawn up as we speak. Your welcome to have your
attorneys take a look at ’em but I need you to consider
one thing before signing. – Okay, sure thing. – Lonnie, you’re a quality talent. You deserve to be surrounded
by quality engineers, musicians and producers. Now if you are serious
about kicking your music up to the next level, winning that Grammy one day, we’re gonna need you out
here with us in Los Angeles. – LA? – Bonjour mon cheri. – I see you’re working on your French. So what’s the big news, huh? Enough with the suspense. – Q Records liked my demo. They want to sign me as soon as possible. – Oh my God, Lonnie, this is mighty big, I knew they would love it. I knew they would love it. What’s the matter? This is what you’ve worked so hard for. – They need me to move to LA. – For how long? A year, maybe more. – What did you tell them? – I turned them down. – You did what? – I never thought it possible to feel this way about anyone. I don’t want to leave you. I can’t leave you. I’m happy here. – You can’t give up on this, not for me. You said it yourself, nothing stands between you and the lady. – It’s not giving up. I mean, I guess I’ll just
have to do things differently. – You have me for the rest of your life. We found each other and
that cannot be undone and going to a different city
isn’t going to change that. I can’t have you turn this down for me. If not for yourself, do it for me, do it for the lady. And if it doesn’t work, or you don’t like it, you can come back. I’ll be here. – You’re something else, you know that? I feel so lucky like I’m just gonna be sick or something. – Ah, you’re not going to
get sick on me, are you? – Nah. (jazz music) – Hey everyone, this is Dr. Jeff Gardere and I’m doing a little bit of practicing for that show I’m on called Giant Steps. You gotta check it out but right now, you’re
watching The BeBop Channel and for me, it’s back to practicing. (piano music) (jazz music) – God bless you. (jazz music) – I’ve heard that it’s a melting pot of many different cultures. It’s very interesting to me to meet people that are in countries surrounded by so many different cultures. I think I’ve traveled a lot over the years and I have found that
people want the same things all over the world. And so if people keep
very positive attitude and work together and not be so concerned with a lot of the negative
things in the world and try to stay positive, it’s a better place. (speaking in foreign language) – That’s why for me, I’ve toured Russia before, I’ve toured Asia many times and I just find that people want to provide for their families and what we do is try to take
people somewhere different for maybe two hours during the concert so that they can just not
think about what’s going on and maybe hear some music
that makes them feel good. – There is very specific
music of East Drive. This is there music and I am basically just
joining their repertoire. (jazz music) – Mr. Bill Evans on the saxophone. (jazz music) (upbeat music) – It’s a big pleasure for us to be here. This is our first time in Astana and it is a beautiful city. Thank you very much. And I also find it very interesting because this is in a big energy expo and that’s what we do
every day when we perform, organic energy and that’s what these whole
thing’s about is new energy. So we try to create
new energy every night. So I think it’s only fitting to have jazz here. Thank you. I have a fantastic band. Living in New York and
he’s played with everybody, literally everybody from Art Garfunkel, Blood, Sweat and Tears, pop, rock, jazz, he’s the best, Dave Anderson on the bass. (audience cheering) And now the guitar, also from New York and he has also played
on over 1,000 CDs, 1,000, and he’s one of the most in
demand recording guitar players in the world, Mitch Stein on the guitar. (audience cheering) And on the drums, one of
the great creative talents. He’s a great singer, great drummer, he’s got a band called Paris Monster. He’s been touring with many,
many bands including his own. We’ve played together for many years. The great Josh Dion on the drums. (audience cheering) (jazz music) ♪ Well my mind is going
through some changes ♪ ♪ I’ve been going out of my mind ♪ ♪ Every time you see me going somewhere ♪ ♪ Feels like I’m (mumbles) ♪ ♪ She had me running on ♪ ♪ She had me running on ♪ ♪ She had me ♪ ♪ Oh yeah whoa ♪ ♪ She (mumbles) ♪ ♪ But it was alright ♪ ♪ Was alright, oh now ♪ (jazz music) – Jorge’s from Peru. I played in Peru, Jorge when was that? 2010. In 2010, I played with a bass player, I went to play in Peru and he was there, he was (mumbles). He was there in the audience. We met for the first time, we spoke a little bit and then I later on organized
a session in New York and we get to play with a lot of people, play as many sessions in New York with many different people but when the three of us are
to play for the first time, it was like, oh wow, something special, like we understand each other. I know very, very little but then we came here and we have this wonderful person to help us learn about this culture, to discover the food, to discover the spirit of the people. We went sightseeing. (jazz music) – Yeah, we’re having a
great time at the festival. What a superb three night
festival we’re having. We’ve had the East River Band, we’ve had Bill Evans, tonight we’ve had the (mumbles) Trio and now we’re having Billy Cobham, excellent. I’m a real jazz fan. What a superb concert. Congratulations to
Kazakhstan and the expo, wow. – Welcome to the New York Jazz Workshop. (jazz music) – Today, I would like to discuss how you can play two, five,
one chord progressions. – Vocabulary, technique, ear training. – Lip flexibilities. – Dynamics, how soft you sing, how loud you sing. – You have to feel the music and– – Have fun. (saxophone music) – Hi y’all. I’m Dr. Jeff. Now, you probably know me
as America’s psychologist but I’m also one of
Mickey’s oldest friends and we were running back on 82nd Street on the Upper West Side. – That’s real easy. You know BeBop was born
and raised in Harlem. – And that was the revolutionary
music at that time. From Charlie Parker,
they all come to New York and it came from Harlem, that’s our stuff. (jazz music) – [Male] You got 500,000. – What you want me to do? Work in Harlem for $50 a night? – Oh really, are you serious? – Damn. Man, we’re opening up a
joint on 135th Street. You want in? – Lenox Lounge is closed. What you got? Instapic or Instagram or
whatever the hell that shit is. (saxophone music) – Got a deal, it’s a deal. – Hey look man, keep your
eyes off my girl, alright? Keep that little crusty ass
knarly toe man out the cradle. ♪ M-I-C-K-E-Y-P-L ♪ – All I hear you do is putting people down and telling them how they can’t sing, how they can’t play, how terrible they are. (yelling) – [Big Daddy] I own this shit, Big. I own them, I own this place. Come on, man. (sad music) – No, that’s just not right. – It’s nice to play, nice, its very rare that
I get a chance to play in the country, much less the city or
region generally speaking where my family is from. I have a wife, she is from Patagonia. Her name is Fayina and she’s also my manager so be careful. But before we get into that, I’d like to introduce you to my colleagues starting with this little person over here who’s big person up here like this. Camilia Benasour. Next to her, basso, Christian Galvez. One of the guitar greats,
Jean Mariyakay and from Scotland, Steve Hamilton, Edinburgh. (jazz music) ♪ Happy birthday to you ♪ ♪ Happy birthday to you ♪ ♪ Happy birthday (mumbles) ♪ ♪ Happy birthday to you ♪ – I have a school. It’s only for one week a year. It’s in Arizona, called Retreat, The Art of the Rhythm Section Retreat and it’s all discussing the social aspects of playing together in a band, what band members on guitar,
bass, drums and keyboards and how to work better together, teaching teachers how to teach students to work better together as a group. So we bring them in to play with musicians from different parts, from the US on scholarship. So primarily we get companies
like Siemens or someone to underwrite because it’s a philosophical project. It’s to help to keep music alive by learning to read better, identifying the music, how to be creative in the
rhythm section in real time. When you come to a jam
session, what do you do? How do you play in a jam session? How do you make use of
the time most effectively for you and the musicians on stage? What do you need to do? (jazz music) ♪ Well my mind is going
through some changes ♪ ♪ I’ve been there at the minute of time ♪ ♪ Every time you see me going somewhere ♪ ♪ Feels like I’m going out of my mind ♪ ♪ Trying my baby ♪ ♪ She left me behind today ♪ ♪ And we was having so much fun ♪ ♪ Oh my baby, she went out on me ♪ ♪ And that’s the reason why I’m running ♪ ♪ Some thing, it’s alright ♪ – Bill Evans heard about
me through other musicians. I played with a great guitar player who we just recently lost
unfortunately, Chuck Lobe. Now he’s a big influence on my life. He introduced me to bill. And also, Bill Evans was, he liked my music from my first band and he liked the singing, drumming thing. So he invited me to come
and play in his band and then I’ve always been a fan of Bill’s from the Miles Davis
records that he played on. And not to mention, all the
other musicians over the years that he’s played with
and made records with. It’s like the best New York and– – [Male] I read about (mumbles). He played with Miles Davis in (mumbles). – Yeah, Herbie and everybody and it’s just a group of
fantastic legendary people. So it’s like, of course, I was like, yeah, said yes. (jazz music) – I met Bill Cobham in 2005. It was a concert in the south of France and the leader of the band was Eddie Gomez and the violin player was Didier Lockwood and Didier Lockwood
introduced to me to that band and we made a concert in quartet with Eddie Gomez, Didier
Lockwood, Bill Cobham and myself. And after that concert, Billy asked me to join
the group the next year. And now it’s 10 years, 11 years I am playing with Billy Cobham. I like many kinds of music. Of course, I started with rock and pop. I went to jazz rock in the ’70s. But I like the jazz, the
real straight ahead jazz too. Yeah, I like this a lot. And by the way, I made my two last cities, I made it in trio, yes, with a very, very jazz,
classical jazz sound. Hello, I’m Jean-Marie Ecay, Cobham’s guitar player. Thanks to join us on TV. – [Announcer] Attention travelers, next Tuesday a major power outage will cause complete chaos
throughout the city. Food, water and phone service
will be in short supply. There will likely be panic city wide. Stand clear of the closing doors, please. – [Female] Disasters don’t plan ahead. You can. Talk to your loved ones about how you’re going to
be ready in an emergency. Don’t wait, communicate. (jazz music) – I wrote this song for Miles Davis. It’s called Tutu. Here we go. (jazz music) (audience applause) Hasta la JAZZIA 2017. Thank you so much. It’s a pleasure, it’s an honor to play for you. Alex Han. (audience applause) Alex Bailey. Marques Hill. Caleb McCambell and yours truly Marcus Miller. Thank you so much. Thank you. We love you. We’ll see you again very soon. Bye bye. (jazz music) (audience applause) – Thank you, good night,
thank you so much, thank you. (jazz music) – Hey everyone, this is Dr. Jeff Gardere, better known as America’s psychologist and I’m on a brand new
show called Giant Steps. Make sure you check it out. It’s right here on The BeBop Channel.

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