Taylor Swift Is Making A Point By Not Initially Streaming “Reputation”

Taylor Swift Is Making A Point By Not Initially Streaming “Reputation”


Hey, Taylor Swift fans. After months of waiting did you rush to
your Spotify account to stream Reputation? Only to find out it wasn’t there? You’re not alone. And why it may have been annoying,
angry even, it’s actually help protect musicians and
the content they create. Here’s why this matters. As wonderful as the so-called
streaming revolution is, our reporter John says this era of
extreme convenience carries with it a sobering reality through
many artists and labels. Even as subscriptions have contributed
to the first growth the music industry has seen in over a decade, streams still
don’t generate as much revenue per listener as downloads and physical album
sales, even though both are declining. Megastars like Swift will be fine
either way, but her team is wise and justified to tinker a little bit with
the model until economic shakeout. Short-term windowing is one option
that seems worth toying with. Maybe there’s no reason to make
new music instantly accessible to everyone on day one. If they hold it back at first,
even if just for a week or two, they can make the most financially of
the people who are most eager to hear it. It’s worked for Swift, who’s already sold
more than 1 million copies of her album. It also worked for Adele, who initially
kept her album 25 off streaming services, managing to sell more than three
million copies in the first week. The promise of the streaming
era is that with time and enough scale,
such experimentation won’t be necessary. The all you can stream subscription
model should eventually reel in enough subscribers and
revenue to pay everyone fairly. When exactly remains to be seen. But in the mean time, don’t be surprised if more artist put
hard to stream with the new albums. And more importantly,
try not to be too mad at them either.

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