Local Ads in v2009 – AdWords API Hack Day 2010

Local Ads in v2009 – AdWords API Hack Day 2010


>>Hi, let’s just get started, so, Local Ads
in v2009. So, show hands, how many of you guys using LBAs right now, and v13? So, the
only difference in the front of the room, is all these. And [INDISTINCT] how it works.
All right, [INDISTINCT] you guys. I’ll cover it out in a second, but basically, I will
be going over local extensions which are the new version of LBAs. They work in a fairly
different way. I thought they’re more flexible and they give us more flexibility to go on
[INDISTINCT] type of spot, they’ll see half of them. So, LBAs are going to be completely
deprecated, once the v2009 is the new standard. Local hide extensions are fully supported
in v2009. And v2009 also supports reading of LBAs, but it does not support the creation
of new LBAs. So, what’s this means is you can use v2009 to reading your LBAs, translate
that [INDISTINCT] to local extension extensions. But–we’d still need to use v13 in order to–actually,
sorry, using v2009, so you can change the status of LBAs involved, so once you’ve–the
transition, then you can set them to save it. If you want to create new LBAs, you still
need to use v13, but obviously, we don’t recommend it anymore, because if you want any V tool
it had to be v2009. Any questions about that? Okay. So, common features. Basically, what
are the advantages of using Local Ads instead of regular TextAds? For one thing they’re
serve on Google Maps. So when somebody searches for plumber, New York City on Google Maps,
LBAs or the ads that show up in the total left panel, right at the top and at the bottom
of your [INDISTINCT] results. LBAs can also show up as a custom icon on Google Maps, on
the map itself. So, say you’re a plumber; you can actually create a little icon, that’s
a plunger; that sticks out on the map, instead of the usual red Google Maps marker. If you’re
a carpet cleaner, you could do a vacuum. If you’re a lawyer, you could do it, you know,
with scales, I think. So that kind helps you standout on Google local search results. When
they’re not displayed as an icon on the map, they basically, look like a regular TextAd,
you can see two examples of local business ads there. Local business ads and local ad
extension, both serve on Google search–proper Goggle search results under the [INDISTINCT]
as well. Where they look like just regular TextAds except with that [INDISTINCT] line
of text. If you enter a city only, it’s just shows New York, New York. If you enter an
entire street address, these shows up an entire street address. So that really helps customers
recognize that you’re close by to them when they search for carpet cleaner, okay? So,
LBAs as you guys may know are a completely separate ad type. Actually you know that better
as a key developers, and people who use the AdWords [INDISTINCT], because you actually
deal with objects, but it was an entirely separate type of objects. It requires a confirmed
physical location in the Local Business Center. The Local Business Center, you guys can prove
here, it doesn’t have what the Local Business Centers is. Okay, so the Local Business Center
is if you go to Google Maps, and you search for a plumber, organic results, the natural
results that are not keyed are typically taken from our Local Business Center database. Any
small business or even large business, anyone that have a physical presence basically can
go into Google Maps, into our Local Business Center section and enter their business details
including their hours of operation, upload a picture of the–in front of their store.
Any other details about their business and how that show up as a natural search result,
when somebody searches–that’s not paid, they don’t have to pay for that, it’s [INDISTINCT]
free and if you love doing businesses, go ahead and do that. In order to create an LBA,
you needed to have a confirmed physical location in the Local Business Center. And then we’ll
link the ad into the Local Business Center. There were some exemptions though, that some
partners with their trusted contact, would like to create local business ads without
going through LBC. But with most part–the vast majority, anyone can learn to create
an LBA had also have a confirmed LBC location. Furthermore each ad was only associated with
one street address. So, say you–one or two uses the same ad copy for 12 different stores
that you own. You’d have to create 12 identical ads. And then, if you have a typo on one,
you have to delete all 12 and create 12 new ones. Another limitation with LBAs is that
we require that the headline of the ad, that first line. Be identical to the business name.
And that was to keep a certain level of consistency with Google Maps or organic listings. Now,
we have local extensions. Local extensions are not an ad type. They’re basically metadata
that you associated with a campaign or TextAd that provides basically a location context,
when that TextAd is going to show. So you attach the address at the campaign level or
at the TextAd level. And when the ad serve, sorry, yeah, when an ad serves, it picks up
from the campaign level by default. The location that best matches, were of course the search
word. So for example, I create a one location at campaign level, one address at the campaign
level. And I created a lot of TextAd. Sorry, let’s say, two locations at the campaign level,
one for Boston; one for New York. And then I have one TextAd to this location agnostic,
it’s just, you know, it’s a set of TextAd, to see my products better. If somebody searches
for a plumber in New York that ad would show with these fifth line of text as a New York
address. If someone for a plumber in Boston, it would show the fifth line of text for Boston
address. And if somebody searches for a plumber in Oakland, that ad might still show, but
it would only show the first four lines, it wouldn’t show any sort of address underneath
it. And it wouldn’t show on Google Maps. You can also attach an address to a single ad
just like Local Business Ad, I’ll cover that in a minute. So, you can create, you can kind
of take the broader route or you can take the more specific route. And the editorial
policy is the same as TextAds. I mean, that you can make the headline whatever you want.
So, you’re no longer subject to that same location and having that headline have to
match with the business name. Okay, so as I just hinted, you can create an extension
at the Campaign-Level or the Ad-Level. So, I’ll cover the difference a little bit. All
right, so at the campaign-level. You attach one or more addresses directly to a campaign.
You can import the addresses from LBC. So, if you have an LBC account with 300, you know,
national chain stores across the country, you can import all 300 in these locations,
directly and see them in AdWords. Or you can manually upload addresses. But we do limit
you to nine manually created addresses. So if you need more, you need to have them confirmed
and entered through the Local Business Center. And as I mentioned, the Ads pick up the best
matching address when they serve, so Boston and New York for example. All right, so those
are at campaign levels exemptions, right. That does it in location or multiple locations
at the campaign-level that can be picked up by any ads. But you can also create ad on
it, you can also attach these locations specifically to one individual ad. So if you have an ad
that for example, you want to put the text Boston into it, or you want to have a promotional
that’s only available for people in Boston, you would only want it, you know, show that
ad for specific location. So in this case, if you basically do what we call you create
an AdOverride and that takes one of the locations that’s AdGroup campaign level and pairs it
with an individual ad and that ad will only show when the search is for that specific
location. So this ad will no longer just show as a general TextAd. If someone searches for
a plumber in Oakland, that ad won’t show, if it has a specific, you know, LocationOverwrite,
that show. So–and the AdGroup is coming from the pool of campaign extensions, and so, before
you can create an ad–an individual AdExtension, you need to have that campaign extension in
your general pool. Okay. So, let’s take a look at an example. So here we have a campaign
that contains a single AdGroup and two ads. At the campaign level, I’ve created three
individual addresses: one in San Francisco, one in New York, and one in Chicago. Ad number
one has no AdOverride attached to it. And therefore, it can show for any of those three
cities or any of those three individual addresses, but then, again, if somebody searches for
Dallas or Omaha or something, it can show just as its regular four lines of text without
the address indicated. Ad number two, I have created what we call an AdOverride and I’ll
cover all–go into more details and terminologies in a moment. So ad number two has one specific
address. There’s address in New York City attached to it. And that means that it will
only show for people that are searching specifically in or for New York City. Any questions about
that? Okay. So, terminology. Okay. So, the base class for a lot of this is what we call
an AdExtension. And an AdExtension is a very generic object that you’ll see more of not
just for the LocationExtensions throughout the AdWords API. And it’s even a term that’s
used in the AdGroup department as well. It’s not just the type of trend. An AdExtension
refers to any metadata that we associate with an ad like a TextAd, in this case, to enhance
the way that it appears or enhance the way that it in the way that it serves. A LocationExtension
is a subtype of an AdExtension where you’re attaching location-specific address data to
an individual ad. LocationExtension is the important, you know, type [INDISTINCT] in
creating [INDISTINCT] or creating a local ads in each [INDISTINCT]. A CampaignAdExtension
is a pairing of one AdExtension and one campaign. So, you’re basically–and again this is what
more of a generic type. It’s a pairing of a–in this case, you–for local ads at least
you’d be comparing a LocationExtension and a campaign. It’s a relationship between the
address and the campaign with that linkage. And an AdExtensionOverride is the linkage
between an individual ad and a LocationExtension. I say here AdExtension in the bottom two bullet
points but moreover, AdExtension is just these [INDISTINCT] type of the LocationExtension.
So, in these cases while you’re creating local ads, you’ll just be using a LocationExtension
as your AdExtension. Okay, so these are the terms and the names of the classes that you’ll
be focusing on when creating your local ads. Okay, so, here’s not quite pseudo-code walking
through creating a new extension. So the first step, you have an address and you have the
Geocode of that address. You do that with what we call the GeoLocationService, which
is really the GeocodeService but we call it the GeoLocationService for reasons that I
don’t understand but just to agree with. There’s a new [INDISTINCT] called a Geoworld and the
GeoLocation means something else and Geocoding is actually what this is, which is just converting
an address into a lot of [INDISTINCT]. So that is basically rolled up into a GeoPoint
object, the latitude and longitude for that given address. All right, so the next step
is you create that LocationExtension object using the GeoPoint. Basically you’re throwing
that latitude and longitude into a LocationExtension object. It represents the address as it links
to an ad or a campaign. Create the CampaignAdExtension object which, again, is the relationship between
a campaign and an address and the LocationExtension. And then, you just mutate it to–or call “mutate()”
to upload it. And now you have that CampaignAdExtension at your campaign level associating the address
that you’re [INDISTINCT]. So, just doing this for one individual address will create that
one address of your campaign and automatically, you’ll find all of the ads [INDISTINCT]. So
that’s–these four steps are all you have to do so that you can add an address to all
of the ads inside your campaign. Okay, Ad-Level Location Extensions are going to be easier,
because we’ve already created the CampaignAdExtension on the previous page, which is what we’ll
be using to identify the individual address. So first, use the CampaignAdExtension.get,
it’s the service.get to retrieve a list of the address and you’ve already have AdGroup
campaign level. Then using an AdExtensionOverride objects, you create a relationship between
that CampaignAdExtension and an [INDISTINCT], and an individual ad. And there are number
of times I said extension in this presentations. I’m getting my time done. But basically the
AdExtensionOverride is the object that pairs an ad and with an address here, an address
that’s at the campaign level. And then you call “mutate()” to upload the AdExtensionOverride
you’ve just created. And I know that perhaps just because of this [INDISTINCT] extension
appears here, is all just really confusing, especially on the terminology. I know, the
first I looked at it, I was, “What, what’s going on?” [INDISTINCT] extension, extension,
extension, but it makes sense that you have [INDISTINCT], you know, 10 minutes, take a
look at the sample code we have. Take a look at the, you know, there’s all types of [INDISTINCT]
to00and, you know, [INDISTINCT] at creating an AdGroup. It makes sense after you [INDISTINCT].
All right, Final questions? All right, thank you very much, guys.

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